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The English International College’s
Sixth Form

Welcome

Head of Sixth Form
Mr Willis - Head of Sixth Form

Whether it is through the Academics, the cultural experiences, the sporting successes, our commitment to numerous charities or our unique Horizons programme, we aim to provide the foundations for students to realise and develop their talents and passions. These are key formative years - university is just around the corner - and it is crucial that our students begin to engage with the world around them, developing their intellectual and personal skills necessary to thrive after leaving EIC. We are extremely proud of our students. The English International College is an extended family where teachers and tutors provide extensive support for the students. Students leave EIC with outstanding examination results, the life skills they need to succeed and go on to the best universities in the UK and the world.

We have high expectations for our Sixth Form. We are always concerned about both their academic progress and social welfare. We require them to approach their studies in an organised and rigorous manner. We consider it very important to provide a friendly, working atmosphere within a stable structure.

The English International College has now been established for nearly 40 years and we feel justifiably proud of our excellent track record of examination results and prestigious university placements. We look forward to the future with optimism and enthusiasm, feeling sure that, in the Sixth Form at EIC, we can provide the right conditions that will allow each student to flourish. We are determined that every student achieves to the best of their abilities and makes life-long friendships. Students participate sucessfully in international debating competitions, both in and outside the school. Students participate in sporting competitions and achieve excellent results.

Our rigorous, rounded and relevant curriculum enables our students to be extremely desirable to universities and future employers.


Our Aims

  • To provide friendly surroundings and faces, enabling the process of study to continue without interruption or anxiety.
  • To provide small study and teaching groups where emphasis can be placed on individual assistance.
  • To encourage social awareness and the development of a mature and responsible attitude towards the college and the community.
  • To be aware of students’ needs and to give supportive and constructive guidance.
  • To provide established, consistent routines.

Which Course?

We offer a range of academic subjects for Advanced Level study, dependent on option choices.

  • Art & Design
  • Biology
  • Business Studies
  • Chemistry
  • Computing
  • Drama and Theatre Studies
  • Economics
  • English Language
  • English Literature
  • Latin
  • French
  • Geography
  • German
  • History
  • Mathematics
  • Further Mathematics
  • Physics
  • Politics
  • Sociology
  • Spanish

Requirements for Entry to Sixth Form

  • Entry is selective and by invitation.
  • Six IGCSEs Grade C or above, including English and Maths. Normally a student is required to have already gained an A or A* grade (or 7-9) at IGCSE level in the subjects they wish to study at A Level.
  • Alternatively, if GCSE has been studied, we require a minimum of six B grades (or equivalent if graded 1-9) including Maths and English and require A or A* grades to study a given A Level.
  • A Level Further Mathematics requires an A* at IGCSE or permission from the Head of Mathematics.
  • Other qualifications will be judged on merit and entrance testing.
  • New students joining us with different educational backgrounds will be expected to have gained equivalent qualifications and be prepared to be assessed in the subjects they wish to study.
  • All students must prove willing to work hard and show a sense of responsibility towards the organisation of their own study time. Developing maturity is essential.
  • The school may apply discretionary requirements in certain circumstances.

What We Expect from Students

  • A serious attitude to study and the will to work, making efficient use of private study time.
  • A positive contribution to school life, and to the Sixth Form in particular.
  • Consideration for, and co-operation with, staff and fellow students.
  • Punctuality in arriving to school, lessons, study periods, and in the submission of homework assignments.
  • Attendance to all lessons properly equipped, having completed the necessary reading and preparation.
  • Students should devote a considerable amount of time to work over and above that spent on assignments which are specifically set.
  • Students are expected to adhere to the dress code.
  • A sense of humour.

Charity

Our Aims

The English International College has forged links with numerous charities over many years.

  • Year 13 students make a trip to Morocco to support three very worthwhile charities: children with Down’s Syndrome, a school for deaf children and a charity for babies with rickets. Students take bags of clothes and essential supplies which help the children greatly.
  • The PTA, students and teachers give a great deal to the Red Cross. Many families are in need and the school raises collections of food and dry goods. Year 12 and Year 13 students take the goods to a sorting centre and distribute the food to those in need.
  • EIC also has very strong links with DEBRA, the butterfly-skin charity. Many of the Sixth Form students help DEBRA to sort clothes and work in the DEBRA charity shop for a few hours, raising money for this very worthwhile charity.

University

Our Aims

  • Full guidance for university and college entrance primarily to the UK (UCAS), Oxbridge, UK Russell Group, plus the United States, Spain and worldwide. Help is given to prepare for interviews and entrance examinations. We are a registered centre for UK universities’ admissions testing (such as tests for prestigious law and medicine courses); we can also support students’ entry for SATs (USA application tests).
  • A chance to develop and exercise leadership and social skills. This is encouraged by the delegation of duties and an involvement in extra-curricular activities, drama and sports. The Sixth Form are expected to participate in a number of assemblies and special events, which include the Christmas Concert performed by the Sixth Formers that raises money for children’s causes.

Horizons

Our success at placing EIC students in top universities is always a cause for celebration, both at Speech Day and in our annual ‘Roll of Honour’. This success is a result of many school strategies, including Horizons, which complement EIC’s rigorous academic curriculum. Top universities have advised us that students should be widely read – they should enjoy reading for its own sake. They should have gone beyond their A Level syllabuses – they should be familiar with the history, and the key thinkers, of their chosen subjects. They should be serious-minded young adults and should be prepared to take the lead in interviews.

Therefore, our course has the following aims:

Students should aspire to be widely read. They should be familiar with key-thinkers, events or innovations. Eventually, students should be prepared for university in the wider sense, including the aspiration to speak or debate in public, or lead a tutorial. They should be able to communicate their enthusiasm, a project or commitment they are proud of and to respond with maturity. Moreover, Horizons students will listen critically to others.

This is an ambitious course credited by the ‘Horizons Diploma’; however, the world is looking for independent, critical thinkers!

We have showcased the Horizons Department and our school’s talents in recent years; we have taken part in Debating Championships at home and around the world: Mexico City, The Hague, Bucharest and Prague. We have reached five world finals in the past six years, and were World Debating Champions (2016 and 2017). We are currently European Winston Churchill “Young Leaders” Debating Champions, which EIC won in Bucharest.

Physical Education

Physical Education is viewed as an important and integral part of the curriculum and, at EIC, we aim to promote physical activity and a healthy lifestyle.

The PE staff endeavour to make their lessons purposeful and enjoyable for all. A measure of this success is the regular, full attendance and the friendly camaraderie that exists between staff and students. Highlights of the school year feature staff and student football, volleyball, and tennis matches. Students are offered a wide range of options including basketball, football, swimming, tennis, padel tennis, fitness, rounders, badminton and beach rugby. The girls have exclusive use of a local, private gym. We also invite local sportsmen or women in from time to time to offer alternative activities.

Each student receives their own individualised PE shirt. They are expected to wear this with the option of tracksuits in the winter as well as suitable trainers. Physical Education is compulsory for Years 12 and 13 and emphasis is on participation and enjoyment. We are proud of some of the excellent results we have achieved in inter-schools sports fixtures. Physical activity within the Sixth Form programme is seen as an integral component of the success of students at this level; indeed, the benefits of exercise to student health, motivation, concentration and levels of stress, have been extensively documented.

A LEVEL COURSES

Fine Art

Qualification:

A Level Linear 2 Year Course

Board:

Edexcel Fine Art (9FAO)

Assessment:

Component 1. Personal Investigation. Internally Set. 60% of the overall marks.
Component 2. Externally Set Assignment. Set by Edexcel. 40% of the overall marks.

Fine Art

About the course

Students must adhere to the assessment objectives for the course:

  1. Develop ideas through sustained and focused investigations informed by contextual and other sources, demonstrating analytical and critical understanding.
  2. Explore and select appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes, reviewing and refining ideas as work develops.
  3. Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions, reflecting critically on work and progress.
  4. Present a personal and meaningful response that realises intentions and, where appropriate, makes connections between visual and other elements.

*These are the assessment objectives for the course.

Fine Art incorporates the exploration of practical and critical/contextual work through a range of processes and media. The disciplines are painting and drawing, printmaking, sculpture, lens-based image making.

Students should also:

  • understand how ideas generate starting points for art and design practice and form an integral part of the creative process.
  • understand how images and artefacts relate to ethical and political contexts.
  • undertake sustained development and refinement of ideas
  • develop their visual language to communicate ideas
  • demonstrate skillful use of the formal elements, including line, tone, colour, shape, pattern, texture, form and structure.
  • record evidence of their progress, in an on–going critical and analytical review.
  • respond to a theme, stimulus or ideas.
  • make connections between their investigations and creative intentions.
  • realise intentions.
  • produce and present outcome(s).

Entry Requirements/Guidance

In order to be able to make a strong start at this level, a 7, 8 or 9 must be achieved at GCSE Level (equivalent to the old A or A*). However, exceptions are sometimes made and we will accept a 6 (B) where we see true potential in someone. Rarely, but entirely possible, is to embark on the A Level Fine Art course without having completed a GCSE in it, but this possibility is reserved for extremely gifted and talented students who, after internal assessment, show that they are at the required level.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

Having an A Level in any endorsement of Art and Design can lead to degrees and careers as a:

  • Fashion illustrator
  • Children’s book illustrator
  • Comic book illustrator
  • Film storyboard illustrator
  • ARTIST: Painter, Sculptor, Installation artist or any other practitioner that works autonomously in any given field of Art and Design
  • Graphic Designer
  • Set Designer
  • Prosthetics
  • Architect
  • Interior Designer
  • Fashion Designer
  • Make-up Artist
  • Prop-maker
  • Art Historian/ Gallery Curator
  • Art Therapist
  • Marketing/ Advertising artist
  • Events Planner
  • Exhibition Designer
  • Art Teacher
  • Printmaker
  • Photographer
  • Video Game Designer
Biology

Qualification:

International A Level

Board:

Pearson Edexcel

Assessment:

AS Examinations:
UNIT 1: Lifestyle, Transport, Genes and Health
UNIT 2: Development, Plants and the Environment
UNIT 3: Practical Biology and Research Skills

A2 Examinations:
UNIT 4: The Natural Environment and Species Survival
UNIT 5: Energy, Exercise and Coordination
UNIT 6: Practical Biology and Investigative Skills

Biology

About the course

In the International A Level Biology course many of the ideas introduced at IGCSE level are explored in much greater depth. Aspects of human biology considered include cardiovascular disease, muscular and nervous control and co-ordination. These are interesting and relevant to students considering studying medicine. Examples of other topics studied include human influences on climate, biodiversity, energy flow in ecosystems, and the biochemistry of photosynthesis. There is a strong practical emphasis throughout the course and students complete compulsory practicals in units 1,2,4 and 5. In the context of this experimental work, students have a chance to improve their understanding of how practical investigations are planned and carried out and how the results they yield are recorded and interpreted. During the course our students take a field trip to the National Park at Doñana where they have a chance to become acquainted with a region of international significance in terms of conservation.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

Biology IGCSE or equivalent grade A. It is useful but not essential to have studied Chemistry at IGCSE or equivalent.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

  • Medicine
  • Research Science
  • Pharmacology
  • Biology
  • Ecology
  • Nature Conservation
  • Biotechnology
  • Veterinary Science
  • Forensic Science
  • Government Agency Roles
  • Science Writing
  • Teaching and many others.
Business Studies

Qualification:

International A Level

Board:

Pearson Edexcel

Assessment:

There are 2 exam papers at AS, one based on marketing and the other on basic business finance and management.

For the full A Level these 2 papers count for 50% of the marks, with another 2 papers for the other 50%.

One of these exam papers covers business strategy and decision making while the other focuses on global businesses.

Business Studies

About the course

In Business you will look at a number of different businesses facing different challenges. You are expected to analyse the key factors involved and have to recommend the best course of action for a business given its existing position:

  • Should it launch a new product?
  • Should managers increase staff pay or give more to investors?
  • Should a business target emerging economies?
  • How should you raise the money needed to fund expansion?

Essentially the course is about decision-making in a business context and as such it develops invaluable skills whatever you want to do next. You need to learn and understand the theory but then apply it to a context. The “right” answer will depend on the problem in front of you and you need to be able to think issues through logically, put together well-reasoned arguments and make recommendations. It involves analysing situations and making choices.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

There is some Maths involved in Business Studies, particularly in Year 13, so it is a requirement that all Business Studies students have at least a grade B in Maths IGCSE.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

Most students will go on to a Business-related degree. This might be something general, like Business Management, or more specific, like Marketing. Business is, by its nature, a vocationally useful subject and while some students may go on to a career in an area of a business, such as sales or promotion, there is a wide range of possibilities open to anyone with an understanding of how a business operates.

Chemistry

Qualification:

International A Level

Board:

Pearson Edexcel

Assessment:

AS Units:
Unit 1: The Core Principles of Chemistry
Unit 2: Applications of Core Principles of Chemistry
Unit 3: Chemistry Laboratory Skills I.

A2 Units:
Unit 4: General Principles of Chemistry I – Rates, Equilibria and Further Organic Chemistry
Unit 5: General Principles of Chemistry II – Transition Metals and Organic Nitrogen Chemistry
Unit 6: Chemistry Laboratory Skills II.

Chemistry

About the course

Chemistry affects the lives of every one of us. Chemistry is an exciting and challenging subject to study as it helps to unravel the mysteries concerning materials of every description including the human body. The role of a chemist is a very important one in all aspects of our life. In fact we use very few materials that have not been changed in some way by a chemist. Chemical research may be targeted where it is dedicated to making new substances which are more effective, cheaper and with fewer disadvantages than those used at present, or fundamentally where it is designed to further our understanding of how and why things are as they are.

The course aims to:

  • Stimulate and sustain an interest and enjoyment of the subject while fostering imaginative and critical thinking with acquisition of knowledge.
  • Study aspects of chemistry that are often in the media and affect lives, such as climate change, green chemistry, pharmaceuticals and chemistry research.
  • Give students a practical experience that will develop and enhance these skills.
  • Appreciate the interlinking patterns in the subject.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

A grade A in Chemistry IGCSE or equivalent.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

An A2 Level in Chemistry is essential for students wishing to go into the fields of:

  • Medicine,
  • Dentistry
  • and Veterinary science.

It is a must for the fields of:

  • Biology,
  • Biochemistry,
  • Chemical and Marine Engineering,
  • Food Science,
  • Pharmacy,
  • Water Science
  • and Agricultural Science.

It is also extremely useful for careers in development of new materials in the fashion, fragrance and cosmetic industries, as well as in art restoration.

Classical Civilisation

Qualification:

A Level

Board:

OCR

Assessment:

Paper 1 (2hr20): The World of the Hero
Paper 2 (1hr45): Greek Theatre
Paper 3 (1hr45): Beliefs and Ideas

This is a two-year linear course; there is no AS option and so students would be required to continue this subject to the end of Year 13.

Classical Civilisation

About the course

Classical Civilisation gives students the opportunity to explore the history, literature and culture at the heart of Europe’s development. Students will read and analyse one of the oldest works of western literature, Homer’s Odyssey, and compare with the great Roman epic, Virgil’s Aeneid, on the founding of Rome in the aftermath of the Trojan War. Students will also learn about the foundation of drama in the Ancient Greek world and read select tragedies and comedies. In the final module, students will study cultural ideas of the ancient world, including its religion, politics and attitudes towards love and relationships. Throughout the course, students will make connections between both the Greek and Roman ancient civilisations and our modern world, and grow to understand further how much these ideas have shaped the world around us today.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

This is an essay-based subject therefore students should have achieved a good grade in English and/ or History IGCSE. There is no requirement to have studied Latin at IGCSE.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

A qualification in Classical Civilisation hones a number of key skills, such as analysis of historical sources and of literature, evaluation and essay writing skills. As such, it prepares students well for further study of a variety of disciplines in the arts and humanities, as well as providing a complement to more scientific paths at tertiary level.

Computer Science

Qualification:

International A Level

Board:

Cambridge

Assessment:

The full A Level Computer Science course is examined by the Cambridge International Examination board.

It consists of four units, all of an equal weighting and all written papers. The course is modular in design, Papers 1 and 2 being examined at the end of Year 12, Papers 3 and 4 being examined at the end of Year 13.

Computer Science

About the course

We all take the internet, email, everyday applications and computer games for granted, but at some point someone who studied Computer Science had a hand in creating them. All around us is evidence of expertise in computing, not just in terms of how computers and programming work but the higher-level analytical skills required.

The course will suit students who are logical and who have an analytical approach to problem solving. It is excellent preparation for students looking to take a Computer Science or computing related degree. If you would like a career as a programmer, computer engineer and would like to work in the telecommunications industry, then this course is appropriate. Students from this course have gone on to gain places at Oxbridge and other top Russell Group universities. Importantly, because of the focus on logic, systematic analysis and problem-solving, students with qualifications in computing are highly regarded by employers and universities alike.

This course not only gives you the opportunity to gain a top grade but enhances your personal skills in problem solving, critical analysis, working both independently and as part of a team to achieve solutions. What will you learn? You will gain an in-depth knowledge and understanding of how computers work, from the microprocessor to memory, storage, operating systems and network architectures.

You will develop knowledge of programming theory and acquire practical skills in developing software programs. Programming will include a study of VB Net, Python, HTML, CSS, Javascript and SQL.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

This is a demanding A Level subject which has certain prerequisites. A minimum of a B grade in IGCSE Mathematics is essential. Obviously a grade B in Computer Science or ICT at IGCSE is advisable, but not essential. Indeed studying Mathematics at AS Level is also advisable. The overriding essential is an interest in the subject and a desire to learn more, with a goal to achieving a high grade at A Level.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

  • Software Developer
  • Web Developer
  • Information Security Analyst
  • Database Administrator
  • Quality Assurance
  • Network Administrator
  • Computer Network Architect
  • Computer Systems Analyst
  • Computer and Information Research Scientist
  • Business intelligence Analyst
Drama

Qualification:

A Level

Board:

Pearson Edexcel

Assessment:

Component 1: Practical performance & Portfolio of 2500-3000 words (80 marks).
Component 2: Two practical performances: 1 monologue or duologue and 1 group performance - external examiner (60 marks).
Component 3: Written paper - 2 hours 30 minutes (80 marks)

Drama

About the course

The A-Level course will involve taking part in drama performances and exploring theatre practitioners and performance texts. You will extend your ability to create drama and theatre, either in a performing or production role. You will also be required to write about the dramatic process of devising, how drama can go from page to stage and to develop your powers of analysis to become an informed critic.

COMPONENT 1: DEVISING (40%)
You will devise an original performance piece using a play text and theatre practitioner as stimuli. You will be assessed on a written portfolio (2500- 3000 words).

COMPONENT 2: TEXT IN PERFORMANCE (20%)
You will perform in a group performance of one key extract from a play text as well as a monologue or duologue to an external examiner. This exam is practical and does not involve coursework .

COMPONENT 3: THEATRE MAKERS IN PRACTICE (40%)
This is an externally assessed 2 hour and 30 minute written paper in three sections. In section A you will be required to analyse and evaluate a live theatre performance you have seen. In section B you will answer two questions based on an unseen extract from one of the play texts you have studied. In section C you will answer one question based on an unseen section from your second chosen play text.

Please note this is a 2 year linear A Level course with no AS Level option.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

You will have achieved a grade 7, 8 or 9 at GCSE Drama. You must be interested in gaining a greater understanding of how theatre and plays work and that you are confident to perform on stage as a group as well as individually. English Language /English Literature IGCSE at grade B or above are also advantageous. Trips - you will be required to go on a compulsory theatre trip to London or elsewhere to see English-speaking theatre.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

This A Level can lead to further study in Drama, Theatre Studies and Performing Arts in Higher Education at degree level. It can be used as part of your course to broaden your studies and skills and may lead to a career in the performing arts industries, media arts, journalism and teaching. Drama and Theatre Studies A Level complements a range of subjects such as English Literature, Art and Design, and is useful in building confidence and improving presentation skills in a range of careers.

Economics

Qualification:

A Level

Board:

Pearson Edexcel

Assessment:

There are 2 papers at AS (Year 12), 1 covering microeconomics & the other macroeconomics.

The AS counts as 50% of the full A level.

There are another 2 papers for the full A level (Year 13), again covering microeconomics & macroeconomics.

Economics

About the course

Many people imagine Economics is a science that allows bankers to make money, like alchemists conjuring gold. In fact, it is far more important than that. Economics is all about the choices we all make everyday in our lives, and about how the incentives we have determined these choices. Different economic agents, be they consumers, firms, workers or governments, face different incentives, and it is the interaction of these agents that determine what is produced, how it is produced and who gets the product.

Economics considers itself to be a science and as such the main tools of an economist are the economic models. These try to simplify the choices faced by economic agents so that we can change one variable, like the price of a good or interest rates, and see the effect this change will have. Taken together, micro and macroeconomics give a complete understanding of the economy.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

We insist that only those students taking Maths A Level should consider Economics. Having an interest in current affairs is also important, as are essay writing skills, and students who study History, Politics or Geography will find parts of Economics familiar.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

There are a wide range of degree and career opportunities for students of Economics, as mathematicians with the ability to use this to provide a qualitative analysis, they are highly regarded. Many go on to degrees in Economics or on Economics-related courses, such as Management. Others go on to International Relations or other contemporary courses. For careers, most obviously there is the financial sector, be it in investment banking, accountancy or risk analysis. Other areas include the diplomatic service, law or journalism.

English Literature

Qualification:

A Level

Board:

Cambridge

Assessment:

AS Level:
Component 1: Examination - Paper 1 Drama and Poetry: 2 hours (50 marks) Worth 50% of final AS Level grade Worth 25% of final A Level grade
Component 2: Examination - Paper 2 Prose and Unseen: 2 hours (50 marks) Worth 50% of final AS Level grade Worth 25% of final A Level grade

A Level:
Component 1: Examination - Paper 3 Shakespeare and Drama: 2 hours (50 marks) Worth 25% of final A Level grade
Component 2: Examination - Paper 4 Pre- and Pose - 1900 Poetry and Prose: 2 hours (50 marks) Worth 25% of final A Level grade

English Literature

About the course

Cambridge International AS & A Level Literature in English will provide students with the opportunity to gain further knowledge and understanding of international poetry, prose and drama, with candidates studying all genres at both AS and A Level.

A wide range of inspiring set texts offer a depth and breadth of literary study and to encourage lively and stimulating classroom discussion. At AS Level learners will study three set texts and prepare for one unseen text. At A Level they will study four further set texts. All exams are extract based (like the IGCSE) but closed book, meaning you cannot have a copy of the full text with you.

Throughout the AS and A Level course, students will be encouraged to practise their skills in close reading through the study of literary extracts and unseen texts; developing skills of analysis and interpretation of texts, alongside their expression of personal response to the texts studied. Students will also explore the conventions of genres of texts and the contexts in which works have been written, read and received.

At A Level students will further develop their subject knowledge through the evaluation of opinions and ideas, both their own and those of others. This opportunity to evaluate critique is a useful skill to bridge the transition between A Level and degree level.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

You will have achieved an A or A* grade in IGCSE Literature in English.

You must also:

  • be a willing reader of both the set texts and your own wider reading
  • be confident in forming your own opinions and analysis of texts
  • be willing to express your views in the classroom and engage in class discussion
  • be a fluent and accurate writer

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

An A Level in Literature in English reflects good communication skills and a wide cultural knowledge: skills that are important for whatever degree or career you choose.

English Literature can be studied as a single subject at degree level or combined with a wide variety of other subjects. Philosophy, Anthropology, Archaeology, Classics, Politics, History, Law or Languages all combine well with the study of English Literature.

English Language

Qualification:

A Level

Board:

Cambridge

Assessment:

AS Level:
Component 1: Examination - Paper 1 Reading: 2 hours 15 minutes (50 marks) • Worth 50% of final AS Level grade • Worth 25% of final A Level grade
Component 2: Examination - Paper 2 Writing: 2 hours (50 marks) • Worth 50% of final AS Level grade • Worth 25% of final A Level grade

A Level:
Component 1: Examination - Paper 3 Language Analysis: 2 hours 15 minutes (50 marks) Worth 25% of final A Level grade
Component 2: Examination - Paper 4 Language Topics: 2 hours 15 minutes (50 marks) Worth 25% of final A Level grade

English Language

About the course

Cambridge International AS Level English Language provides students with opportunities to make critical and informed responses to a wide range of texts. They will also demonstrate their ability to produce writing to specific briefs and for given audiences.

Cambridge International A Level English Language students will also develop a strong foundation in the study of linguistics, focusing on language change, child language acquisition, spoken language, English in the world, and language and the self.

Students who follow the Cambridge International AS & A Level English Language syllabus will develop the following skills and understanding:

  • sustaining accurate, fluent and consistent writing
  • producing informed responses appropriate to the specified form, style, context, and audiences
  • conveying knowledge and understanding from both specific examples and wider studies.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

You will have achieved an A or A* grade in IGCSE English Language.

You must also:

  • be a willing reader of a full range of texts, including your own wider reading
  • be confident in forming your own opinions and analysis of texts
  • be willing to express your views in the classroom and engage in class discussion
  • be a fluent, accurate and imaginative writer

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

In studying English Language at A Level, you develop your skills as a communicator. This is particularly useful, whichever degree course or career you decide to follow.

It forms a good foundation for study in any arts-based degree in combination with, for example, History, Social Studies, Media Studies, Foreign Languages and Politics.

Extended Project Qualification

Qualification:

EPQ

Assessment:

The EPQ is assessed internally (with external moderation) and requires students to submit a dissertation of roughly 5000 - 6000 words.

Students must also submit an activity log, journalling their progress throughout the project, an evaluation of how they feel their project has gone and they must give an oral presentation on their project at the end of the course.

Projects should be submitted by the October of Year 13.

Extended Project Qualification

About the course

The Extended Project Qualification is a challenging course, designed to more fully equip sixth form students with the skills required at university level. It allows students to explore in depth a subject they are passionate about, be it a particular angle related to their chosen career path or a completely unconnected childhood hobby!

The course develops key undergraduate-level skills including how to research, reference, construct detailed arguments and avoid plagiarising. As such, it is viewed very favourably by top universities and taken into consideration during the university application process. The course runs from the beginning of Year 12 when students participate in seminar sessions on varied topics, including an introduction to ethical frameworks, sessions on critical thinking and lessons on how to research and reference.

Students also have weekly one-on-one tutorials where they can discuss the progress of their project and receive personalised guidance as required.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

As the EPQ is an extended piece of writing, students should have a confident grasp of English language skills; a good grade in English or History at GCSE is required. However, the most crucial skills required to complete the EPQ successfully are a genuine interest in the project area and the self-discipline to manage a long-term project.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

Due to the broad nature of the EPQ, it can be an asset to a wide variety of paths to further education. Several Russell Group universities, including Oxbridge, strongly encourage applicants to undertake an EPQ and it can be a strong component of any application.

French

Qualification:

A Level

Board:

Pearson Edexcel

Assessment:

IAS
Unit 1: Spoken expression and response. 30% of the total IAS. 15% of the total IAL.
Unit 2: Understanding and written response. 70% of the total IAS. 35% of the total IAL.

IA2
Unit 3: Understanding and spoken response. 15% of the total IAL.
Unit 4: Research, understanding and written response. 35% of the total IAL.

All units are externally assessed.

French

About the course

The content covers the following general topic areas (GTAs):
IAS • Youth matters • Lifestyle, health and fitness • Environment and travel • Education and employment.
IAL • Youth matters • Lifestyle, health and fitness • Environment and travel • Education and employment • Technology in the French-speaking world • Society in the French-speaking world • Ethics in the French-speaking world.

Unit 1: Spoken expression and response
Section A: Spoken response – Respond to four Pearson-set questions on a stimulus related to one of the student’s two chosen general topic areas (GTAs).
Section B: Discussion – A discussion relating to the GTA.

Unit 2: Understanding and written response
Section A: Listening.
Section B: Reading and Grammar.
Section C: Writing – requires students to write an email or article of a recommended length of 240–280 words in French based on a short, printed stimulus written in French and four related bullet points.

Unit 3: Understanding and spoken response
Section A: Presentation and Debate.
Section B: Discussion.

Unit 4: Research, understanding and written response
Section A: Listening.
Section B: Reading and Grammar.
Section C: Writing – Requires students to answer one question, in French, from a choice of two, that relates to a literary text chosen from the prescribed list. Students should write 300-400 words.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

You should have achieved a grade A or above in your (I) GCSE examination and have a real interest in learning the language, as it is a very demanding subject. You should keep up to date with current affairs in the country of the target language.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

As well as specialising in the study of the language itself, you can combine the language with many other specialist subjects. A language will be an enrichment to any career and will open doors. In an even more globalised world, the need for linguists is constantly increasing and appealing to a huge variety of employers.

Some popular combinations in the past have been:

  • French + business studies
  • French + law
  • French + finance
  • French + journalism
  • French + literature
  • French + a science
  • French + economics
  • French + any humanities subject.
Geography

Qualification:

A Level

Board:

Pearson Edexcel

Assessment:

AS level:
Unit 1- 1 hour 45 min
Unit 2- 1 hour 30 min

A2 Level:
Unit 3- 2 hours
Unit 4- 1 hour 30 min

Geography

About the course

Geography lies at the junction between Science, Maths and the Humanities. It is regarded as a facilitating subject and is often considered as a Science by Universities. This means it works well with almost any combination of subjects. It shows that those who go the Science route can write and communicate effectively and that those that take the Arts / Languages / Humanities route can understand enough science and data to analyze and navigate our increasingly complex world. It mixes current affairs, critical analysis and how to interpret world systems, both political and cultural as well as biodiversity and natural disasters.

At AS level the course is divided into two units which cover both human and physical (natural hazards and the human response to this). There is a compulsory field trip that takes place in the first term of Year 12.

For the A2 level the course consists of topics on Energy, Superpowers, Biodiversity and Atmospherics. There is also a six week research topic on a choice of Tectonics, Human response to disease, Culture or Food production.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

Generally the requirement is a B or above at IGCSE. If you have not taken Geography at IGCSE you can still be considered for the course on a case by case basis. Student work ethic and dedication are also important factors, so all applicants are considered on a case-bycase basis.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

Geography is regarded as a facilitating subject. It provides employers with evidence that you can deal with many different aspects of a job. Potential careers are as diverse as Environmental Engineer, Petroleum Geologist, Oceanographer or Disease prevention specialist to Journalism, Film and Documentary production, International relations, Law or Political analyst.

German

Qualification:

A Level

Board:

Pearson Edexcel

Assessment:

IAS
Unit 1: Spoken expression and response. 30% of the total IAS. 15% of the total IAL.
Unit 2: Understanding and written response. 70% of the total IAS. 35% of the total IAL.

IA2
Unit 3: Understanding and spoken response. 15% of the total IAL.
Unit 4: Research, understanding and written response. 35% of the total IAL.

All units are externally assessed

German

About the course

The content covers the following general topic areas (GTAs):
IAS • Youth matters • Lifestyle, health and fitness • Environment and travel • Education and employment.

IAL • Youth matters • Lifestyle, health and fitness • Environment and travel • Education and employment • Technology in the German-speaking world • Society in the Germanspeaking world • Ethics in the German-speaking world.

Unit 1: Spoken expression and response.
Section A: Spoken response – Respond to four Pearson-set questions on a stimulus related to one of the student’s two chosen general topic areas (GTAs).
Section B: Discussion – A discussion relating to the GTA.

Unit 2: Understanding and written response.
Section A: Listening.
Section B: Reading and Grammar.
Section C: Writing – Requires students to write an email or article of a recommended length of 240–280 words in German based on a short, printed stimulus written in German and four related bullet points.

Unit 3: Understanding and spoken response
Section A: Presentation and debate.
Section B: Discussion.

Unit 4: Research, understanding and written response
Section A: Listening.
Section B: Reading and Grammar.
Section C: Writing – Requires students to answer one question, in German, from a choice of two, that relates to a literary text chosen from the prescribed list. Students should write 300-400 words.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

You should have achieved a grade A or above in your (I) GCSE examination and have a real interest in learning the language, as it is a very demanding subject. You should keep up to date with current affairs in the country of the target language.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

As well as specialising in the study of the language itself, you can combine the language with many other specialist subjects. A language will be an enrichment to any career and will open doors. In an even more globalised world, the need for linguists is constantly increasing and appealing to a huge variety of employers.

Some popular combinations in the past have been:

  • German + business studies
  • German + law
  • German + finance
  • German + journalism
  • German + literature
  • German + a science
  • German + economics
  • German + any humanities subject.
History

Qualification:

A Level

Board:

Pearson Edexcel

Assessment:

Paper 1
1B: Russia in revolution 1881-1917

Paper 2
2B: China 1900-1976

Paper 3
3C: Germany 1871-1990

Paper 4
4D: South East Asia 1945-1990

History

About the course

Paper 1
1B: Russia in revolution 1881-1917 • Political Reaction and Economic Change -Alexander III and Nicholas II 1881-1903 • The First Revolution and it’s impact 1903–1914 • The end of Romanov rule, 1914–17 • The Bolshevik Seizure of Power October 1917.

Paper 2
2B: China 1900-1976 • Order and disorder 1900-1976 • The Impact of the World on China 1900-76 • Economic Changes 1900-76 • Social and Cultural Changes 1900-76.

Paper 3
3C: Germany 1871-1990, united, divided and reunited (forbidden combination with Germany on Paper 1).

Paper 4
4D: South East Asia 1945-1990 • What explains the outbreak, course and impact of the Korean War in the period 1950-53? • The Emergence of the Cold War in South East Asia 1945-60 • War in Indo-China 1961-1973 • South East Asia without the West: the fading of the Cold War 1973-1990.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

Students should have a strong portfolio of IGCSEs (5 or above) including either an A*- B in either History, Politics or another essay based qualification, for example, English Literature.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

History is very practical, because it involves:

  • Learning about people – how they interact, the motives and emotions
  • Learning about countries, societies and cultures – so many of today’s conflicts have their roots in the past
  • Learning to sift facts – to identify truth and downright lies
  • Presenting what you’ve learned in a way that makes sense to others – having the confidence to defend your findings.
  • Investigating skills- to autonomously be able to plan, organise and conduct research and raise critical questions about a certain topic or event.

All these skills are valuable in a whole range of jobs.

Nicky Campbell and Simon Mayo are History Graduates. The BBC foreign affairs correspondent Jeremy Bowen did the same from University College London. Other famous graduates in the media include comedian Sacha Baron Cohen, aka Ali G and Melvyn Bragg, who both graduated from Oxford.

Maths and Further Maths

Qualification:

A Level

Board:

Pearson Edexcel

Assessment:

AS Qualification (Year 12)
Maths
- P1, P2 and M1/S1 (all 1.5 hours)
Further Maths - F1, M1 & M2 (all 1.5 hours)

A2 Qualification (Year 13)
Maths - P3, P4 & D1 (all 1.5 hours)
Further Maths - F2, M3 & S2 (all 1.5 hours)

Maths and Further Maths

About the course

Mathematics lies at the intersection of the arts and the sciences. The International A Level course is extremely versatile and useful because of it’s in built problem solving capabilities – both universities and future employers find this aspect invaluable.

It can be combined with a range of other A Level subjects; beyond the obvious combinations of Maths and Sciences, or Maths and Economics, in recent years students have also studied Maths in conjunction with English, Art, Humanities and Languages A Levels. Equally, it can be studied for its own sake - just for the joy of it!

Entry Requirements/Guidance

Our guidelines would be a Grade B at IGCSE for Maths, and at least a high Grade A at IGCSE for Further Maths. Student work ethic and dedication are also important factors, so all applicants would be considered on a caseby- case basis.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

Although Maths & Further Maths have an obvious link to degrees such as Engineering, Science, and Finance, it is a facilitating subject that is viewed equally highly in degrees such as Law and Psychology. Universities understand the difficulty of the A Level, and appreciate the fact that it teaches problem solving, persistence and lateral thinking.

Music

Qualification:

A Level

Board:

Pearson Edexcel

Music

About the course

The study of Music at A Level is both practical and academic. It is an engaging and rigorous course that develops many musical and non-musical skills. If you have a passion for Music and a strong musical background, A Level Music is an excellent choice. Studying Music opens doors to many opportunities, regardless of what you plan to do in the future. Here’s what Oxford University says about studying Music:

“The varied nature of the course enables students to develop highly desirable skills in areas such as self-management, creativity, data analysis, performance, teamwork, problem-solving, and communication, all of which makes them an attractive prospect for potential employers. Other popular destinations for Music graduates include broadcasting, publishing, law, politics and the Civil Service. Rather than limiting your prospects, studying Music opens doors to a wide range of careers.”

Entry Requirements/Guidance

Our guidelines would be a Grade A at IGCSE for Music, and at least Grade 5 on an instrument/voice. Student work ethic and dedication are also important factors, so all applicants would be considered on a case-by-case basis.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

Aside from what is mentioned above, it is worth bearing in mind that the transferable skills gained through studying music are applicable to a huge variety of career paths including: musician, music therapist, music teacher, TV producer, sound technician, broadcasting engineer, events management, marketing, soundtrack composer, music venue manager, arts administration.

Physics

Qualification:

International A Level

Board:

Pearson Edexcel

Assessment:

AS Units:

  • Unit 1: Physics on the Go
  • Unit 2: Physics at Work
  • Unit 3: Exploring Physics

A2 Units:

  • Unit 4: Physics on the Move
  • Unit 5: Physics from Creation to Collapse
  • Unit 6: Experimental Physics

Physics

About the course

The course aims to:

  • Develop students’ interest in, and enthusiasm for, the subject including developing an interest in further study and careers in the subject.
  • Appreciate how society makes decisions about scientific issues and how the sciences contribute to the success of the economy and society.
  • Develop and demonstrate a deeper appreciation of the skills, knowledge and understanding of the subject.
  • Develop an understanding of how knowledge is acquired through experimental investigation and how such investigations underpin our understanding of key concepts.
  • Develop essential knowledge and understanding of the laws that govern our universe.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

Physics IGCSE or equivalent grade A.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

If you study Physics at A Level, your qualifications can open up the possibility of exciting work in areas such as aerospace, engineering, technological innovation, scientific journalism, telecommunications, consultancy, administration or electronics. You might like to work in environments such as hospitals, research laboratories, agricultural establishments, classrooms, oil industries or the Civil Service.

Politics

Qualification:

A Level

Board:

Pearson Edexcel

Assessment:

This is one of the new ‘linear’ A Levels, this means that there is an AS exam at the end of Year 12, which is a stand alone qualification. If you continue in to Year 13 you will sit the full A Level, covering the material from both Year 12 and Year 13.

The AS is a UK based course, with two papers: UK Politics & UK Government.

The full A Level has three papers: UK Politics and Core Ideologies, UK Government and Non-Core Ideologies & Comparative Politics (USA)

Politics

About the course

The study of politics will help you understand the massive influence political decisions, structures and ideologies have on our daily lives. Recent years in the UK have seen a referendum, a general election, Brexit & the Supreme Court intervention, while in the US there have been Presidential & Congressional elections & impeachment of the President. Politics helps you to understand these events, why they occurred, the reactions to them and the possible consequences.

If you have an interest in current affairs, this subject is vital to improve your understanding. It is a subject where much of the textbook is out of date by the time it is printed, with new events and examples appearing all the time. The course will help you examine your own views and see the range of differing ideologies. In this way it will help you define and refine your own opinions and express them with clarity.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

There are no specific entry requirements, but you should have a real interest and some knowledge of UK & US politics today. AS and A Level Politics combines well with other subjects, most notably essay writing subjects, such as History, English and Modern Foreign Languages, and subjects with a strong current affairs element, such as Economics and Geography.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

Politics is useful in its own right, making you a more informed and involved citizen. As an analytical subject students may go on to study subjects such as Politics, History, International Relations or PPE. Often Politics students become actively involved in student politics while at university. Careers might include law, journalism, any role in business which requires you to analyse and use information and, of course, future Prime Minister!

Pre U Latin

Qualification:

Pre U

Board:

Cambridge

Assessment:

There is no assessment at the end of Year 12.

Students sit four papers at the end of Year 13:

Paper 1: Verse Literature
Paper 2: Prose Literature
Paper 3: Unseen Translation
Paper 4: Prose Composition or Comprehension

Pre U Latin

About the course Cambridge

Pre-U qualifications were designed by a group of leading UK independent schools with the aim of equipping students more fully for the demands of studying at university level. They encourage students to become independent and self-directed learners; to think laterally, critically and creatively, and to acquire good problem-solving skills; and to promote comprehensive understanding of subjects through depth and rigour. The Latin Pre-U qualification is an academically rigorous course which builds on the skills learnt at IGCSE level. Students have the opportunity to further hone their understanding of the mechanics of the Latin language, and to read and analyse a wider range of prose and poetry texts in their original form. It is recognised and highly regarded by top universities internationally.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

The Pre-U course is challenging; students must have achieved the top grade in IGCSE Latin to opt for this subject.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

The benefits of studying Latin are enormous. Students are given the opportunity to develop a broad range of academic skills from the linguistic to the problem solving, as well as to deepen their understanding of the foundations of western civilisation through their exploration of the history, culture and literature of the ancient world. Due to this broad reach, Latin prepares students for a wide range of careers from arts and humanities to the sciences, as well as the more traditional routes of law, medicine and teaching.

Qualification:

A Level

Board:

Cambridge

Assessment:

IAS
Paper 1 - Socialisation, identity and methods of research
50% of the AS Level 25% of the A Level
Paper 2 - The Family
50% of the AS Level 25% of the A Level

IAL
Paper 3 - Education
20% of the A Level
Paper 4 - Globalisation, Media
and Religion
30% of the A Level

Sociology

About the course

Sociology is the study of human behaviour and the interaction between human groups and institutions. The debate about how much we can reshape society is central to the subject, but in order to do that you need to have an idea about how people function. It encourages learners to think critically about contemporary social, cultural and political issues and to consider these from different perspectives. It provides opportunities to explore key concepts and debates that underpin society and to develop the skills of interpretation, application, analysis and evaluation while studying a range of stimulating topics and real-world issues.

At IAS the course is divided into two papers covering topics such as social identity, diversity, social change and gender equality.

At IAL the course has two papers that cover education and social mobility as well as globalisation, media and religion.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

This subject is not offered at IGCSE so entry will be considered on a case by case basis. It is an essay based subject. so good English skills are necessary. Sociology combines well with other subjects, most notably essay writing subjects, such as History, English and Modern Foreign Languages, and subjects with a strong current affairs element, such as Economics and Geography. However, it can also work well as an essay based subject to complement Mathematics and Science based subjects.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

Sociology is regarded as a desirable subject by many top Universities, as it requires critical thinking skills and an analytical mindset. It can lead to many different career paths such as Law, Criminology, Banking, Education, Social Work, Social Policy, Politics, Journalism or International Relations.

Spanish

Qualification:

A Level

Board:

Pearson Edexcel

Assessment:

IAS
Unit 1: Spoken expression and response. 30% of the total IAS. 15% of the total IAL.
Unit 2: Understanding and written response. 70% of the total IAS. 35% of the total IAL.

IA2
Unit 3: Understanding and spoken response. 15% of the total IAL.
Unit 4: Research, understanding and written response. 35% of the total IAL.

All units are externally assessed.

Spanish

About the course

The content covers the following general topic areas (GTAs):
IAS • Youth matters • Lifestyle, health and fitness • Environment and travel • Education and employment .

IAL • Youth matters • Lifestyle, health and fitness • Environment and travel • Education and employment • Technology in the Spanish-speaking world • Society in the Spanish-speaking world • Ethics in the Spanish-speaking world.

Unit 1: Spoken expression and response.
Section A: Spoken response – Respond to four Pearson-set questions on a stimulus related to one of the student’s two chosen general topic areas (GTAs).
Section B: Discussion – A discussion relating to the GTA.

Unit 2: Understanding and written response.
Section A: Listening.
Section B: Reading and Grammar.
Section C: Writing – Requires students to write an email or article of a recommended length of 240–280 words in Spanish based on a short, printed stimulus written in Spanish and four related bullet points.

Unit 3: Understanding and spoken response
Section A: Presentation and debate.
Section B: Discussion.

Unit 4: Research, understanding and written response
Section A: Listening.
Section B: Reading and Grammar.
Section C: Writing – Requires students to answer one question, in Spanish, from a choice of two, that relates to a literary text chosen from the prescribed list. Students should write 300-400 words.

Entry Requirements/Guidance

You should have achieved a grade A or above in your (I) GCSE examination and have a real interest in learning the language, as it is a very demanding subject. You should keep up to date with current affairs in the country of the target language.

This course will lead to (degree/careers)

As well as specialising in the study of the language itself, you can combine the language with many other specialist subjects. A language will be an enrichment to any career and will open doors. In an even more globalised world, the need for linguists is constantly increasing and appealing to a huge variety of employers.

Some popular combinations in the past have been:

  • Spanish + business studies
  • Spanish + law
  • Spanish + finance
  • Spanish + journalism
  • Spanish + literature
  • Spanish + a science
  • Spanish + economics
  • Spanish + any humanities subject.

EIC ALUMNI

Alumni

As the Sixth Formers graduate and move into the wider world the English International College looks to retain it's strong bonds with students through the EIC Alumni Association. It's main objective is to foster relationships among the alumni and the EIC community as a whole through regular formal and informal events in London, and beyond. This results in networks that share a common purpose in preserving and promoting EIC's unique ethos and culture. Moreover, a platform to share and celebrate the school’s extraordinary success.

Admissions

We recognize the importance of choosing the right school for your family and we are here to help. Please take the time to read through the Admissions pages to familiarise yourself with the admissions process, but don't hesitate to contact us if you have questions.

When you are ready please visit the Making an Enquiry page to begin the process of joining us.

Admissions

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